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In Belize, learn where chocolate comes from

28 January 2011 2 Comments

The following article appeared on DALLASNEWS.COM

PUNTA GORDA TOWN, Toledo District, Belize — A sweet, pungent and slightly tangy scent drifts upward to the palm-thatched patio, mixing with the salty sea breeze here at the Chocolate Center of the Universe, otherwise known as Cotton Tree Chocolate.

I contemplate the iced mocha melting on my tongue, and my newly discriminating olfactory can now discern an extra edge: Toledo has taught me why chocolate tastes and smells the way it does.

Cacao is the Toledo District’s biggest export, and I’ve seen it now in all stages of production. A week before, I went to stay in a Mayan village through the Toledo Ecotourism Association’s guest house program, and I took a tour of Reyes Chun’s cacao farm in San Antonio Village. Hiking with Reyes and his boys down a footpath through the jungle, I saw the football-size pods hanging from the trunks of the trees. Reyes whacked at one with a machete and chopped it in half, handing it to me to taste the tangy-sweet, almost cottony flesh around the seeds. It tasted nothing like chocolate.

Read the full story here: In Belize, learn where chocolate comes from



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  • The Maya Food Of The Gods | Belize Travel Blog said:

    [...] Organic cacao has become one of Belize’s most viable, environmentally friendly, and sustainable crops and is the backbone of small Maya villages who continue to cultivate high quality cacao that is a direct descendant of local genetic strains developed by their ancestors thousands of years ago. [...]

  • The Maya Food Of The Gods | Chaa Creek's Belize Travel Blog said:

    [...] Organic cacao has become one of Belize’s most viable, environmentally friendly, and sustainable crops and is the backbone of small Maya villages who continue to cultivate high quality cacao that is a direct descendant of local genetic strains developed by their ancestors thousands of years ago. [...]

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