Home » Belize Testimonials, Belize Travel Tips

Crown Jewel Of Belize: The Altun Ha Jade Head

18 February 2010 One Comment

By Dr. Jaime Awe
Director, Belize Institute of Archaeology

Kinich Ahau - the Mayan Sun God is in the Museum of Belize.

ABOVE: Kinich Ahau – the Mayan Sun God is in the Musem of Belize.

Ever since its discovery, the jade head has been the subject of much controversy among Belizeans. For years most of us have believed that, shortly after its discovery, this unique Maya masterpiece was spirited out of the country and never returned to its rightful home. To dispel this myth, we at the Belize Institute of Archaeology recently (May 2005) invited Channel 7 to accompany us on a mission to prove that the jade head still resides in Belize, and that it remains one of the crown jewels of the country. Having accomplished our mission we would now like to provide some general information on this exquisite piece of ancient Maya art.

The jade head was discovered at in the Belize District’s Mayan site of Altun Ha in 1968 by Dr. David Pendergast of the Royal Ontario Museum of Canada. The head, along with forty other objects, had been placed within a large tomb that was located below the stairblock on the Temple of the Masonry Altars (Structure B4). At the center of the tomb were the remains of an elderly adult male. This elite person was likely an important ruler of the site during his lifetime and may have commissioned an artist to produce the large carved object. We do not know the exact date that the head was carved, but analysis of cultural remains within the tomb suggests that the burial, and accompanying grave goods, were deposited in the structure sometime between 600 and 650 A.D.

Weighing 9.75 pounds and standing almost 6 inches high, the jade head remains the single largest carved jade object yet discovered in the Maya area. Its crossed eyes, fang-like elements on either side of the mouth, and the ahau glyph on the forehead all identify the head as a representation of the Maya sun god Kinich Ahau. Along with Chac (rain god) and Yum Kax (corn god), Kinich Ahau was among the most important deities in the Maya pantheon.

The Altun Ha jade head is truly a remarkable object and exquisite work of art. It is the only one of its kind in all of Mesoamerica. Because it was carved with nothing more than stone tools, we know that it may have taken many months, if not years, to produce. It was also carved from one large solid piece of jade that was imported from the Motagua River Valley region of Guatemala. Jade was also the most precious of stones to the Maya. Beside its exotic origins, its green colour reflected that of water and the corn plant, the two most precious, life sustaining substances to the ancient Maya of northern Belize.

As it undoubtedly was to the prehistoric inhabitants of Altun Ha, the jade head continues to be a most important icon to the people of Belize today. It is prominently displayed on all Belize currency and has become an important symbol of our young nation. It is truly a remarkable work of art and everyone should make every effort to view it whenever it goes on display.

Come see this rare artifact from February 22 – March 3rd, 2010. ENTRANCE FREE

Belmopan – George Price Center 10:00am – 3:00pm
Dangriga – Dangriga Town Hall 9:00am – 2:00pm
Punta Gorda – St Peter Clavers Parish Hall – 9:00 – 3:00pm
San Ignacio – Cahal Pech Archaeological Reserve – 9:00am-3:30pm
Orange Walk – Banquitas House of Culture – 10:00am – 3:00pm
Corozal – Corozal Town Hall – 9:00am – 2:00pm
Belize City – Bliss Centre – 9:00am – 3:00pm


Tags: , ,


Facebook comments:

One Comment »

Leave your response!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.


− 2 = six